Typha angustifolia (Narrow-Leaved Cattail) - photos and description

 


Male flowers in above photo


Male flowers in above photo.


Female flowers in above photo.


Female flowers in above photo.


There is a gap between the male and female flowers, on this plant the gap was 3 cm long
.


Leaf of Typha latifolia at top of photo is 20 mm wide, leaf of Typha angustifolia below is 6 mm wide.

General: Marsh or aquatic plant with a round stem and long leaves. Rhizomatous, often found in large colonies. Plants glabrous.

Flowers: Flowers in terminal spikes, male flowers above the female flowers. The male flower spike is light brown, the female spike is dark brown. There is a gap of several centimetres between the male and female flowers, we measured this gap at 3 cm long. The male flowers blow away once their pollen is shed, the female flower spike is persistent over the summer. A male flower spike was measured at 18 cm long by 15 mm wide, and a female flower spike was measured at 15 cm long and 10 mm wide.

Leaves: Leaves alternate, sheath the stem, the edges rolled in slightly. We measured a leaf at 85 cm long by 10 mm wide.

Height: Height listed in Budd's Flora to 3 m, we measured plants to 217 cm tall.

Habitat: Slough margins, riverbanks, marshes, lakeshores.

Abundance: Uncommon.

Origin: Introduced.

Similar species: This plant is very similar to Typha latifolia (Common Cattail), and the two species can be found in wetlands growing alongside one another.

- T. angustifolia has a gap of several centimetres between its male and female flowers, while T. latifolia has no gap between its male and female flowers.

- T. angustifolia has narrow leaves growing to 1 cm wide, while T. latifolia has wider leaves growing to 3 cm wide.

- More generally, T. angustifolia grows taller than, and looks more slender than T. latifolia.

When and where photographed: Took the above photos July 6th in a marsh about 45 km southeast of our home in Regina, SK.